Making the cut-Capitol Reef National Park: LAPC

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge this week is cropping the shot. I’m sharing before and after images taken at Capitol Reef National Park near Torrey, Utah. These pictures show examples of making the cut to highlight the subject matter.

Sometimes you want to cut a road out of the picture so you can focus on the scenery. I loved the layered land forms at this park.

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
Before…
Making the cut (cropped image) Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
and after.

Other times there’s a sign you overlooked. How did I not see that?

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
Before…
Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
and after.

But there are other times when you want to emphasize a sign.

Sign at Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
Before…
Making the cut (cropped image) of sign Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
and after.

I was interested in that sign because a thunderstorm was about to break. Needless to say, we did not drive down the narrow canyon.

Note: I also used a perspective correction tool in my photo editing program to straighten the sign.

Sometimes a place deserves a more panoramic view so you give it a little trim. You have to decide where the best place is when you’re making the cut. Hope I didn’t cut it too short.

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
Before…
Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
and after.

And then there are times when you add a little hidden Easter egg and wonder if anyone will notice it when you share the final cropped photo.

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
Before…
Making the cut (cropped image) Capitol Reef National Park, Utah May 2017
and after.

Do you see the tiny tan smudge in the lower left corner on one of the flat rocks? That’s a white-tailed antelope squirrel traveling at Rocky J. Squirrel speed. Not a great picture of it, but good enough that I could identify it later. 😀

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Cropping the Shot

Wet and Wild Otters Haiku: LAPC

Wet and wild otters
Grateful for their liquid world
Tread into its depths

Otter in shallow water, Bend, Oregon 2016

Gliding silently
Steering with slender rudders
In a search for bliss

Otter swimming in shallow water, Bend, Oregon 2016

Meeting and greeting
Leaping and pirouetting
Dancers of the deeps

Wet and wild otters in Bend, Oregon 2016
Wet and wild otters in Bend, Oregon 2016

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – ALL WET

From different perspectives: LAPC

I am trying to take a look at things at home from different perspectives.

The western juniper trees are always ready to be photographed from a distance or close up.

My juniper muse from the ground up.

From different perspectives, juniper from ground up Bend, Oregon 6April2020

Ripples and layers.

Western juniper bark, Bend, Oregon 25April2020

A close up of red bark.

Western juniper bark, Bend, Oregon 6April2020

The lichens and mosses on the rocks in my yard are painting portraits full of color and texture.

A still life of sticks and rocks.

Lichens and moss on rocks, Bend Oregon 6 April 2020

Cheatgrass seeds caught in crevices and moss.

Lichens and moss on rocks, Bend Oregon 5 April 2020

Vibrant yellow lichens amidst darker ones.

From different perspectives, Lichens on rocks, Bend Oregon 25 April 2020

Our pets are grateful we are home and they let us know in their own special ways.

Praying I always stay home this much.

Cat that looks like she is praying, Bend, Oregon 17 April 2020

Finally tuckered out after extra play time.

Tuckered out dog, Bend, Oregon 8 April 2020

Hoping to bring a smile to my face by decorating her white coat with dirt.

From different perspectives, dirty dog, Bend, Oregon 11 April 2020

Hope you are managing your time at home okay. Try to look at things from different perspectives and you may be pleasantly surprised.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) – At Home

The Choctaw’s simple act of kindness: LAPC

A simple act of kindness, Kindred Spirits Sculpture, Midleton, Ireland 5March2020

In 1847, the worst year of Ireland’s Great Famine, people of the Choctaw Nation of the southeastern United States sent a gift of $170 to Ireland. The money, worth thousands in today’s dollars, was collected to help the starving people of Ireland. Over a million Irish people died from starvation and disease in the period from 1845 to 1849.

Honoring a small act of kindness

Cork-based sculptor, Alex Pentek, created the Kindred Spirits sculpture to help honor that simple act of kindness. The Making of Kindred Spirits shows the artist discussing its creation. The 20-foot tall sculpture, in Midleton, County Cork, was unveiled to the public in 2017. It stands in Ballie Park beside a popular walking trail.

Ballie Park, Midleton, Ireland 5 March 2020

But why would the Choctaw have sent such a gift when many of their people were struggling to survive? In 1831, the Choctaw were the first tribe to be forcibly removed from their native lands because of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. People of the Seminole, Cherokee, Chickasaw, and Muscogee (Creek) nations, and many non-natives and people of African descent who lived with the tribes, were also forced to move. Between 1830 to 1850, they forced tens of thousands of people from nine states to move to what is now Oklahoma. The perilous journey would become known as the Trail of Tears. Thousands died from exposure, disease, starvation, and harassment by local frontiersmen.

A simple act of kindness, Kindred Spirits Sculpture, Midleton, Ireland 5March2020

In 1847, the Choctaw were still recovering from the injustice they had experienced. They shared what little they had to help the starving Irish people.

The nine curved eagle feathers of this sculpture, arranged in a circular shape, symbolize an empty bowl. Each feather is different and they represent the Choctaw Nation’s strength, kindness, and humanity.

Close up of Kindred Spirits sculpture, Midleton, Ireland 5 March 2020

A bond between nations

The simplicity of this sculpture and the simple act of kindness it symbolizes, touched my heart. At the unveiling ceremony, a Cork County official said:

They bestowed a blessing not only on the starving Irish men, women and children, but also on humanity. The gift from the Choctaw people was a demonstration of love and this monument acknowledges that and hopefully will encourage the Irish people to act as the Choctaw did.

Joe McCarthy, East Cork municipal officer
Kindred Spirits sculpture, Midleton, Ireland 5 March 2020

Members of the Choctaw Nation attended the opening ceremony. They felt humbled by the recognition they received 170 years later. At the ceremony, the Choctaw Nation’s chief said:

Your story is our story. We didn’t have any income. This was money pulled from our pockets. We had gone through the biggest tragedy that we could endure, and saw what was happening in Ireland and just felt compelled to help…

The bond between our nations has strengthened over the years. We are blessed to have the opportunity to share our cultures, and meet the generous people who have continued to honour a gift from the heart.

Chief Gary Batton, Choctaw Nation
Close up of Kindred Spirits sculpture, Midleton, Ireland 5 March 2020

Update: The kindness continues…

A couple of days ago I read an article in The Irish Times about people in Ireland participating in a fundraiser to help Native Americans suffering from the coronavirus. Native people have been especially hard hit by this virus. A GoFundMe page was set up for the Navajo & Hopi Families Covid-19 Relief Fund on 15 March 2020. Their goal was to raise $1.5 million but as of today, 7 May 2020, they have raised $3,019,390.00.

Donations have come from all over the world, but many of the donors have Irish surnames. They remember the kindness the people of the Choctaw Nation showed them in the past.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) – Simplicity

Fire pits alight at WinterFest: LAPC

Last weekend we visited the Oregon WinterFest event in Bend. I always look forward to seeing the fire pits and there were over 20 entries this year.

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) this week is Treasure Hunt. I thought the fire pits fit perfectly under the suggested topic of “something hot.” Here are a few of the sculptures I saw at the WinterFest event.

A scaly tree holding a suspended ball of fire

Fire pits at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

This one looked like kindling hovering over a fire

Outdoor sculpture at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

Tall and graceful, reaching for the sky

Outdoor sculpture at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

This triangular one had flames that pulsed to the music

Outdoor sculpture at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

A salmon leaping above the flames

Fire pits at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

Cattails swaying in the breeze

Outdoor sculpture at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

A cyclone of spinning metal

Outdoor sculpture at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

The reflective discs spun with the slightest breeze so this one was always in motion

Outdoor sculpture at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

This one reminds me of the space needle in Seattle

Outdoor sculpture at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

Mountains and their wildlife in a lovely panoramic display

Fire pits at WinterFest in Bend, Oregon 14February2020

See my recent That’s some Pig! post for one more of these amazing fire pit sculptures.

I’m impressed by the artists that create these works. The sculptures have to look great and be fully functional as a fire pit. Not an easy task!

More pictures of fire pits at this event:

FIRE!

This World is on Fire