A colorful walk in Portland: 1-to-3 Photo Challenge

Today I’m sharing a photograph of a colorful walk in Portland processed three ways. We visited the Portland Japanese Garden in October 2021. The fall colors are a photographer’s dream!

I’ll be showing how I processed this picture from the garden three ways with Corel PaintShop Pro 2021. Prior to trying out the various effects, I increased the contrast slightly.

The first two show the original and the same picture with a retro effect. For this image I went to Effects>Photo Effects>Retro Lab>Hue 90. This effect blurred the edges like a vignette and cast a green glow over everything. Even the carp in the foreground is green! It’s easy to imagine this as a strange world in a fantasy or science fiction book.

A colorful walk in PortlandGreen vignette retro

The second two show the original autumn scene and the same picture with a warming filter effect. For this image I went to Effects>Photo Effects>Film and Filters. I chose the Vivid Skin Tones option with an orange warming filter. This effect intensified the foliage color and gravel in the foreground.

A colorful walk in PortlandWarming filter autumn foliage

The third two show the original and the same picture with a distortion effect. For this image I went to Effects>Distortion Effects>Ripple. The pond in the image ripples as if a stone was dropped into it. The blurred image focuses your attention on the distinct colors, textures, and composition of this photograph.

A colorful walk in PortlandRipple photo effect

I remember being amazed on this colorful walk in Portland, Oregon. The colors of the foliage and the structure and layers in the landscaping were so impressive!

One-to-Three Photo Challenge May 2022

The Bend Wall: Monday Mural

You’ll find The The Bend Wall mural on the side of Newport Market, a neighborhood grocery store in Bend, Oregon. The bright painting covers a 100-foot long wall on the side of the building.

This impressive piece of artwork was created by Bend artist, Kim Smallenberg.

The mountain in the center of the mural is Pilot Butte, a dormant volcano. On the right side near the peak, you can see a small fire. On the Fourth of July, commercial fireworks are launched from Pilot Butte, and sometimes, it catches on fire. Our Fire Department is always there and ready.

The Bend Wall

A large metal sculpture of a bear sits in front of one end. The mural behind the bear shows dogs around a campfire. Bend is a dog-centered town. Many residents own one, or two, or…

Bear sculpture & dogs mural

The next section shows bridges over the Deschutes River. The solar eclipse is taking place in the skies. In 2017, we had prime viewing opportunities to watch the eclipse here in Central Oregon.

Mural at Newport Market

The next picture shows the heart of town. Kim included several local businesses in the painting. Look at the bottom right of the mural. Can you see beer mugs lining the road? We have a couple dozen breweries in Bend.

Love Bend painting

The last picture shows Mount Bachelor, an outdoor recreation destination. Tumalo Falls splashes down rocky cliffs in the foreground.

The Bend Wall mural

If you visit the west side of Bend, be sure to stop by and look at The Bend Wall. It’s huge and amazing!

Monday Mural

Cars from the Golden Age: LAPC

The Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon has a large collection of cars from the “Golden Age of Transportation” – the period from the early 1920s through the 1940s. The Museum has a collection of over 130 vehicles from the 1900s to the 1960s. You can get more information on vehicles in the collection by year or manufacturer here.

Cars from the Golden Age and beyond

Artifacts from the time period are on display near many of the cars. Here’s a camping scene.

Cars from the Golden Age

Storefronts around the perimeter of the building add visual interest to the collection.

Antique autos

The color and design of the cars make them great subjects for photographs.

Colorful old cars

Here’s a view of the car section from one of the entrances.

Old car collection

You will also see several vehicles displayed near the airplanes. This 1921 Ford Model T shows an example of a car converted into a pickup. Ford didn’t start making pickups until 1925.

Cars from the Golden Age

The 1925 Ford Model T 1-Ton Truck pictured below represents one of their first pickup trucks . This model sold for $295 in 1925.

Cars from the Golden Age

Right next to a yellow floatplane, you’ll see a 1941 Chevrolet Master Deluxe Business Coupe. Their lighted trunk and extra storage space appealed to traveling salesmen.

1941 Chevrolet

Learning something new…

I learned something new at this museum. Have you heard of micro cars or rat rods?

You’ll see cars you recognize plus some you probably never heard of, like this 1981 HMV Freeway micro car. The manufacturer guaranteed 100 MPG when traveling at 40 MPH in the High Mileage Vehicle (HMV).

1981 HMV Freeway

The two cars below are “rat rods.” Wikipedia says rat rods are custom cars “with a deliberately worn-down, unfinished appearance, typically lacking paint, showing rust, and made from cheap or cast-off parts. These parts can include non-automotive items that have been repurposed, such as a rifle used as a gear shifter, wrenches as door handles, or hand saws as sun visors.” 😯

Cars from the Golden Age

There’s a lot to see at this large museum. This post focuses on cars from the Golden Age and beyond. I’ll be featuring photographs of their airplane collection in the future.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Mechanical/Industrial

Whimsical doors in Tumalo, Oregon: Thursday Doors

I noticed these whimsical doors in Tumalo, Oregon while visiting a pod of food trucks. The Bite currently hosts five food trucks. You can get an assortment of beers on tap inside the main building. There is comfortable seating inside and out.

These paintings were done by local artist, Nicole Fontana. There are more pictures of her work at The Bite here. She even included her whimsical take on things in the signs for handicapped parking spots. 🙂

whimsical doors
Fishing fly painting

Thursday Doors

Fighting future fires for free

Here in Central Oregon, homeowners can take steps towards fighting future fires for free. In the spring, you can dispose of yard waste for no charge. In Bend this year, the free disposal runs from April 30 through May 15. Here’s a link showing dates at all locations. The landfill also takes yard waste for half price in early November.

fighting fires for free
Piles of yard waste

You may wonder why the local landfill is taking yard waste without charging the usual amount. Central Oregon is in the exceptional drought category, according to U.S. Drought Monitor.

Prineville Reservoir

We have received some welcome precipitation over the last few weeks, but local reservoirs are at historically low levels. Here are photos of Prineville Reservoir, 30 minutes east of my home in Bend. Can you see the horizontal lines along the shore showing previous water levels? The reservoir level is at 31% capacity. Crescent Lake, another local reservoir, is only 11% full.

Look how far the boat ramp is from the shore!

We have a range of habitats in this area. At my house, western junipers grow between sagebrush and bunchgrass. Our annual precipitation is 10 inches or less. On the west side of Bend, ponderosa pines tower over the landscape. The elevation increases and more precipitation falls as snow. Wildfires can affect both environments.

Fighting fire with fire

Wildfires have increased in size and severity. During the 2020 Oregon wildfire season, more than a million acres burned. We use prescribed burns to burn the undergrowth prior to the fire season.

Prescribed burn
Prescribed burn at High Desert Museum

How Central Oregon is fighting future fires for free

After a couple of devastating fires near Bend in the 1990s, a local fire marshal thought about what could be done to prevent future Central Oregon fires. An insurance company considered donating a new fire engine, but the marshal had a better idea. The FireFree group created guidelines to educate homeowners on how they could protect their property from wildfire. They recommended creating 30-100 feet of defensible space around houses. Recommendations included trimming or eliminating brush and trees near structures.

Fighting fire for free

FireFree came up with a plan to help homeowners fight future fires for free. They picked up yard waste at individual homes at no charge. The program switched to using landfill space a couple of years later. FireFree notes on their website, “The total amount of yard debris collected during FireFree events since 1999 is 444,605 cubic yards. This is enough yard debris to fill almost 44,500 dump trucks.”

Our contributions

We collected groundcover weeds and tumbleweeds (three kinds) from our 2.25-acre property this spring. The giant tumbleweed, with me standing behind it, was 7 feet 6 inches across.

This year, we trimmed low-growing western juniper branches to prevent fire from reaching the tree canopies. Juniper trees often split as they age, and we cut down a large splitter growing too close to our house.

Western juniper branches
6′ x 15′ pile of western juniper branches

We have taken nine loads to the landfill so far.

fighting fires for free
Trailer full of yard waste

I visited the landfill on the first FireFree day this year. Local news stations had been advertising this well-organized event.

Fighting fire for free
Sign for FireFree yard waste disposal

Trucks and cars lined up to dump their loads.

Yard waste
Vehicles dumping yard waste

The city often recycles yard waste into compost which you can purchase at the landfill.

FireFree is a great program other fire-prone communities should consider!

Yard waste at landfill
More vehicles dumping yard waste

Lower Crooked River drive – am & pm: LAPC & FFC

A couple days ago, we went on a Lower Crooked River drive. We were there early in the morning, attempting to avoid an incoming storm system. I remembered I had been there about a year earlier for an afternoon drive. How would the lighting differ in the photos taken on both trips?

Just south of Prineville, Oregon, the Lower Crooked River Back Country Byway winds its way along the Crooked River. The 43-mile long road meets up with Highway 20 to the south.

This post highlights the 8-mile section between Prineville Reservoir and Castle Rock. See map at the end of the post. On this drive, the curving lines of the road and river contrast with the straight lines of geological features.

A morning drive

As we drove north from the reservoir, shadows covered the east side of the road. The morning light cast a warm glow over the canyon lands.

Canyon views

Basalt columns looked pretty in full light…

Columnar basalt

But took on more character in the shadows.

columnar basalt

The Bureau of Land Management notes, “The most significant contributor to the outstandingly remarkable geologic resource are the unique intra-canyon basalt formations created by recurring volcanic and hydrologic activities.”

Chimney Rock was shrouded in shadows. Rays of sunlight snuck through the cloud cover to cast light near the butte’s base.

I have hiked the 1.3-mile trail to the base of Chimney Rock. You get 360-degree views of the landscape and, in the spring, you’ll see stunning desert wildflowers in bloom.

Chimney Rock

As we rounded another curve, I saw the dark gray palisade formations in the distance that always catch my attention.

Crooked River Canyon

An afternoon drive

I remembered seeing them a year before, driving from the opposite direction. The afternoon light was starting to shade the palisade formations near Palisades Campground.

Crooked River Canyon

Parts of the road were in full sunlight, while distant hillsides were shaded.

Winding road

The columns of basalt appeared to bend in the midday heat.

Near the northern end of the Lower Crooked River drive, where the scenic part begins, rimrock formations emerged from smooth hillsides. They serve as a gateway to the Lower Crooked River, where dramatic landforms reflect the light and absorb the shadows.

Crooked River Canyon

Lower Crooked River camping

This section of Highway 27 includes nine campsites and two day-use areas. See Lower Crooked Wild and Scenic River, Chimney Rock Segment for more information.

Bureau of Land Management

Lens- Artists Photo Challenge _ Light and Shadow

Friendly Friday – Leading Lines

Western tiger swallowtail box & photo: First Friday Art

Here’s a western tiger swallowtail painting I did on a small wooden box.

Western tiger swallowtail

Here’s one I saw on the High Desert Garden Tour a few years ago. The Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, ranges throughout western North America.

Seasons Butterfly 21July2018
Butterfly on flowers

The state insect in Oregon is the Oregon swallowtail butterfly, Papilio machaon oregonius. They have paler yellow coloring on their wings.

Would you like to attract butterflies to your garden? Here are a few things you can do, according to Gardeners.com:

  • Choose plants that attract pollinators
  • Limit, or eliminate, your use of pesticides
  • Provide shelter for breeding and avoiding predators
  • Provide water
  • Consider keeping a beehive

For a good list of plants that attract butterflies, go to Attracting Butterflies, Hummingbirds and Other Pollinators.

Do you have artwork you would like to share? Be sure to include the First Friday Art tag.

First Friday Art

Deadwood Stagecoach: Wordless Wednesday

Deadwood Stagecoach

Deadwood Stagecoach, 1867. Buffalo Bill Cody Center of the West, Cody, Wyoming

Wordless Wednesday

Photo in thirds? Bending the rules: LAPC

When taking pictures, you might want to think about composing your photo in thirds. What?

According to the Digital Photography School, the rule of thirds “is a compositional guideline that breaks an image down into thirds (both horizontally and vertically) so you have nine pieces and four gridlines. According to the rule, by positioning key elements along the gridlines, you’ll end up with better compositions.”

While browsing my photos, I realized horizontal layers are more important to me in composition. Do my pictures always follow the rule of thirds guidelines? No, it’s okay to bend the rules.

SLR Lounge notes, “Of all the “rules” in photography, the rule of thirds is one of the easiest to successfully break.”

My photo in thirds examples (with layers)

This sandhill crane is in the upper third corner, but the differing textures and colors of the plants catch your attention. This photo has four layers.

Photo in thirds

This pronghorn is near the lower third of the picture. I could have cropped it more, but I didn’t want to cut out the misty mountains in the background. This photo has five layers.

Pronghorn at Yellowstone

Mount Bachelor, in the upper third of the photo, blends into a flat overcast sky. The foggy forest and flat lake are also muted in color. The “stars” of the picture are the multi-colored rushes and sedges in the foreground. This photo has five layers.

Mount Bachelor

The swans in this Summer Lake scene are near the center line. The dust storm is in the upper third. Both elements are interesting. This photo has a lot of layers – sky, mountains, dust storm, rushes, water, shoreline (with white alkaline deposits), and greasewood shrubs.

Summer Lake sandstorm

The last picture shows a fallen juniper tree in the foreground and the La Sal Mountains in the background. The twisting branches of the juniper are in the bottom third. This photo has four layers.

I don’t always pause to compose a photo in thirds, but I think the last photo comes closest to meeting the rule’s guidelines.

Photo in thirds in Utah

Remember, it’s okay to break the rules! Be spontaneous when taking photos and edit later.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Rule of thirds

The guy next door: Monochrome Monday

the guy next door buck

We have a resident herd of mule deer here and I refer to this buck as the guy next door. He didn’t seem to be bothered by my presence at all.

Monochrome Monday

The path meanders haiku: Haiku poetry challenge

the path meanders
up a rocky desert butte
embraced by spring clouds

the path meanders Fischer Canyon
Fischer Canyon, Oregon

Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge #407 – Path & Desert

A white poppy up close: Macro Monday

A white poppy up close growing in our garden last year. Poppies come in a variety of colors, but they’re also pretty in white.

a white poppy

Macro Monday

Funny bird moments, slightly blurred: LAPC & BWPC

I often look at bird photos I’ve taken later and find out they’re slightly blurred. Fortunately for me, the Bird Weekly Photo Challenge this week is “Blurry.” I’m highlighting funny bird moments to go along with the Lens-Artist Photo Challenge of “Humor.”

This American robin looked kind of mad that I interrupted a private moment with its Ring-necked Dove friend. Ooops!

Ring-necked Dove and American Robin

Is this an ad for Subaru? Look a little closer to spot the Mountain Bluebird admiring its reflection in my mirror. It was quite taken with itself.

Funny bird moments bluebird

I was trying to get pictures of these fledgling Barn Swallows for a while. At one point, one fluttered above its nest mates and turned to laugh at me.

Barn swallow fledglings

We were so busy looking at these mule deer that we almost overlooked the two Burrowing Owls in the foreground. They tried standing still and imitating sagebrush stems but their heads kept swiveling in our direction.

Mule deer and Burrowing Owl

I saw a Western Tanager in my yard once. Really. I did. See, here’s the picture I took to prove it. 😁

Funny bird moments tanager

You never know when you’re going to capture funny bird moments with your camera.

Bird Weekly Photo Challenge #58 – Blurry

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #196 – Humor

Had too much fun on Earth Day

too much fun dead juniper
Western juniper at Fischer Canyon, Oregon

This western juniper looks like it had too much fun on Earth Day. I think it was trying to sleep it off. 😉

Trees

Thermophile color – Nonet poem: LAPC

Thermophile color blooms near Earth’s core
In bouquets of startling brilliance
Fertilized by extreme heat
In caldera water
Where few dare to tread
The Archaea
Find a home,
Warm and
Safe

thermophile color at Yellowstone
Close ups at Yellowstone
Artemis geyser
Thermophile color
Hot spring colors
Grand Prismatic

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Colorful Expressions

Focus on what is important: LAPC

Focus on what is important and blur the distractions.

Burrowing owl

Magnify the delicacy of Nature’s architecture.

Apple blossoms

Find subjects that stand out from the herd and capture their strength.

Focus on what is important - bison

Focus on the palette of colors used to create distant masterpieces.

View from Gray Butte

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Bokeh

Terry’s Hanger Shop: Monochrome Monday

Terrys Hanger Shop

Terry’s Hanger Shop is part of one of the displays at the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum located in Hood River, Oregon. This large museum features airplanes, automobiles, and other artifacts. This shop is one of the many storefronts featured around the perimeter of the building.

Did you notice the sign showing the hours they are open? “Gone Yesterday Today and Tomorrow.” Someone has a good sense of humor. 😉

Monochrome Monday

Gorgeous red Indian paintbrush: Friday Flowers

Gorgeous red Indian paintbrush

I saw this gorgeous red Indian paintbrush at Great Basin National Park in Nevada. This park doesn’t get as many visitors as others nearby, but it’s definitely worth a visit. We enjoyed our drive up to the the 10,000 foot level of Wheeler Peak. We drove by ancient stands of singleleaf pinyon pine, Great Basin bristlecone pine, and curlleaf mountain mahogany covered with a dusting of spring snow. These brilliant wildflowers were near the beginning of the 12-mile long Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive.

Friday Flowers

Ammonite fossil up close: Macro Monday

This picture of an ammonite fossil up close shows their beautiful spiraling structure. In ancient times they were called “snake stones” or “serpent stones.” The stones were thought to have healing and oracular powers. Fossils of these once abundant, now extinct, marine molluscs are popular with collectors.

Ammonite fossil up close

Macro Monday

Peregrine falcon drawing, photo, video: First Friday Art

Here’s a pencil drawing I did of a peregrine falcon guarding its prey. I have been fascinated by falcons ever since I read accounts of Genghis Kahn hunting with them. Some of my earliest crayon drawings are of mounted riders carrying falcons. This site describes the 6,000-year old Mongolian tradition and features photos of falconers on horseback.

Peregrine falcon Siobhan Sullivan

On our trip to Ireland in March 2020, we looked forward to participating in the Dingle Falconry Experience in County Kerry. Trained owls and hawks briefly perch on your gloved hand before flying to the next participant.

This photo shows their peregrine falcon feeding after its flight. The falcon was only handled by the trainer, Andi Chewning.

Dingle Falconry Experience

In this video, you’ll see Andi working the bird by swinging a lure over her head. Once the birds “tag” the lure, the trainer rewards them with food they provide. When falconers hunt with their birds, the falconer takes the prey they catch.

As you can tell by the sounds coming from the participants, watching the falcon in action is an impressive sight.

Here’s a closer look at Andi with the bird on the ground while it’s feeding. My daughter, Chani, filmed this part.

Do you have artwork you would like to share? Be sure to include the First Friday Art tag.

First Friday Art

Stories unfolding in the rock in Wyoming: LAPC

When I drove the highway west of Cody, Wyoming, I saw stories unfolding in rock formations along the road.

The short paved trail in the photo below takes you to a place of wonderment along the North Fork Shoshone River.

Stories unfolding from a distance

The rock formations along the ridgetop are a village of homes with a view carved by the common folk. At one time, the richest man in town lived in a round home atop the tallest tower. He bragged about his wealth to anyone who would listen. One day, he danced with glee around and around inside the house. It fell to the ground, but he survived. From then on, he lived a humble life in a square home and he never danced again.

Stories unfolding in rock

Sheep Mountain is a distinctive landmark about 15 miles southwest of Cody.

Predators kept chasing bighorn sheep herds grazing in the Absaroka Mountains. One ram, larger than all the rest, laid down to keep watch atop a mountain. His immense size frightened the predators away, and he stands guard to this day.

Unfolding stories Sheep Mountain, Wyoming

Traveling farther west, you’ll notice a sign for another attraction. This is Chimney Rock, one of several places by that name in the United States.

Stories with a closer view

The best chef in the land baked a luscious layer cake of soft and hard rock for a special celebration. She told everyone not to touch it until the party.

Chimney Rock

Unfortunately, a hungry, mischievous child cut off a slice before the big event. Uh oh!

Chimney Rock

This appears to be a peaceful scene of multi-colored mountains bordered by trees growing near the river’s edge. Do you see the rock fence on the left side of the photo above the thick stand of green trees?

Stories unfolding Shoshone National Forest

If you look a little closer at the “fence” you’ll see where an angry giant tried to rip the earth apart, forming a deep rift. Stories unfolding in the rock are not always what they seem.

Rift in wyoming

The Palisades stand like elegant castles alongside one section of the road.

The Palisades, Wyoming

The royals wanted their people to have a comfortable place to live. Each shelf on the towers serves as a home for scaled, feathered, and furred residents. The grateful residents tend the gardens growing next to the towers, providing food for all.

The Palisades, Wyoming

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Earth story

Word of the Day – Wonderment

Lost Forest Pine tree: 1-to-3 Photo Challenge & TTL

Today I’m sharing a photograph of a Lost Forest pine tree processed three ways. The Lost Forest is a geographically isolated forest in the High Desert of Central Oregon. A visit to this unique forest inspired me to write a short story.

I’ll be showing how I processed this picture three ways with Corel PaintShop Pro 2021. Prior to trying out the various effects, I increased the contrast and vibrancy slightly.

The first two show the original and the same picture with a box camera effect. For this image I went to Effects>Photo Effects>Time Machine>Box camera. I was pleased how this effect enhanced details of the tree’s structure.

Lost Forest pine treeLost Forest pine tree box camera

The second two show the original Lost Forest pine tree and the same picture with a warming filter effect. For this image I went to Effects>Photo Effects>Film and Filters. I chose the Warm earth tones option with an orange warming filter. This effect made the tree’s red bark stand out. The puzzle-like bark of ponderosa pines is one of their most interesting features. This effect also highlighted the bare branches better than other effects I considered.

Lost Forest pine treeWarming filter on pine tree

The third two show the original and the same picture with a brush stroke effect. For this image I went to Effects>Art Media Effects>Brush strokes. I changed the Softness setting to 20. This artsy effect shows off the shapes and color of the tree and background sky.

Lost Forest pine treeBrush strokes pine tree

One-to-Three Photo Processing Challenge March 2022

Thursday Tree Love (TTL) 126

Looking up at Lava Butte: Wordless Wednesday

Looking up at Lava Butte
Looking up at Lava Butte, Oregon
Lava fields
Lava fields surrounding the butte

Wordless Wednesday

Bridge with a view: Monochrome Monday

This bridge with a view takes you to the entrance of the Portland Japanese Garden. The bridge’s glass walls bring you closer to the natural world beneath you. Straight lines contrast with the curves and textures of the surrounding forest. When you ascend the stairs and exit the path, you’ll enter the Cultural Center. With its minimalistic design, it stands out yet blends in at the same time.

view a with Bridge

Monochrome Monday

Driving around the bend-Sijo poem: LAPC, TTC, SWPC

Driving around the bend, visions of new worlds come into view.
Splashes of warm color, framed in cool blue, catch our attention.
Images pass by fast and vanish, remembered as a dream.

Driving around the bend near Sisters, OR
Sunset near Sisters, Oregon
Painted Hills Oregon
Approaching the Painted Hills, Oregon
Fall color McKenzie Pass
Fall color on McKenzie Pass, Oregon

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) #191- Curves

Three Things Challenge (TTC) #862- Color & fast

Sijo Wednesday Poetry Challenge (SWPC) – Blue

The Guinness Harp at Guinness Storehouse in Ireland

Today I’m sharing photos and a short video related to the Guinness harp. The emblem is based on a 14th century Irish harp known as “O’Neill” or “Brian Boru.” Guinness has featured a harp image on its beer labels since 1862 and trademarked it in 1876. The logo consists of the harp, the GUINNESS® word, and Arthur Guinness’ signature.

Harps outside the Storehouse

Here’s a harp on a sign outside the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin, Ireland.

Street sign in Dublin

Here’s another harp outside the entrance where visitors can take horse-drawn carriage tours.

Guinness harp

Harps inside the Storehouse

Visitors to the Storehouse can get a glimpse of the Downhill Harp. Cormac O’Kelly of Ballinascreen made this harp in 1702. Blind harpist, Denis Hempson (or O’Hampsey), played this harp for many years using traditional techniques.

Downhill harp

The Guinness emblem has changed over the years, but the straight edge is always on the left side. Here’s a more colorful image.

Fun Fact: In 1922, the Free State of Ireland adopted the harp as its official national emblem when it separated from the United Kingdom. Since Guinness had previously trademarked the harp, the government flipped the image so that the harp’s straight edge would be on the right side.

graphics inside Storehouse

Visitors to Guinness Storehouse get a free sample, but if you’re still thirsty, go to The Gravity Bar on the seventh floor. There are five bars and restaurants in the seven-story building.

These glasses of freshly poured Guinness stout feature a harp image.

Guinness beer

Newly remodeled in March of 2020, The Gravity Bar offers scenic 360-degree views of Dublin. Prince William and Kate visited the redesigned bar for an event a couple days prior to our visit.

Dublin view

The images above this harp show a few of the various versions of harps used in advertisements over the years. This is no ordinary harp.

Guinness harp

Visitors, even those with limited musical ability like me, can “play” this harp by running their fingers through its laser strings. Enjoy your St Patrick’s Day today and your Guinness beer any day of the year. Sláinte!

Stilbite up close: Macro Monday

This is a beautiful piece of stilbite up close. Specimens like these, from the stilbite subgroup, can be found near Mill Creek, Polk County, Oregon. The crystals on this mineral are gorgeous, but I also like the parallel lines surrounding the cavity in this piece.

Stilbite up close

Macro Monday

Gray fox basking in the sunlight: LAPC

A gray fox blissfully basking in the sunlight on a log.

Gray fox

Zooming in a little closer to see the details of her coat.

gray fox

Zooming in closer still to focus on her exquisite and intelligent face.

close up from High Desert Museum

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) #190 – Close and Closer

Delicate feather haiku: Weekly Haiku Challenge

delicate feather
propelled by whispers of wind
settles on snow drifts

Delicate feather

Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge – Feather & whisper

Fun with photos – Photo Bloopers 5: LAPC

It’s time once again for fun with photos. Welcome to Photo Bloopers 5! This is what I do with pictures that don’t quite fit in or turned out weird looking. They needed a few words to make them more interesting. Hope they entertain you!

hawk photos with FumFum
Harris’s Hawk at Dingle Falconry Experience in County Kerry, Ireland
Burning Man truck
Truck featured in Burning Man exhibit, High Desert Museum, Bend, Oregon
Carousel horses
Carousel horses at Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum, Hood River, Oregon
Dog watching deer
Dog “guarding” garden from mule deer, Bend, Oregon
Crack in the Ground
Rock formations at Crack-in-the-Ground, Oregon
Fun with photos
Black Sand Basin and my hand, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Do you want to see more of my fun with photos pictures? Check out the Photo Bloopers tag.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Odds and Ends

Sisters quilt mural: Monday Mural

Sisters quilt mural

This Sisters quilt mural is located in Barclay Park in Sisters, Oregon. This work by local artist, Jerry Werner, celebrates all that makes this town a vibrant community. In the past, Jerry worked as an illustrator for Walt Disney. His artwork includes murals, fine art, paintings, illustration and graphics, and sculptures.

The Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show bills itself as the world’s largest outdoor quilt show. More than 1,300 quilts are hung outside along the town’s main streets and visitors use maps to find them all. The quilts are amazing and show so much creativity and skill!

Monday Mural

Nanday Conure embroidery: First Friday Art

I did this Nanday Conure embroidery on a denim shirt for my brother when he had one as a pet. When I created this piece, I had never embroidered before so I used a running stitch throughout. Since the shirt was badly wrinkled when I took this picture, I dressed up the image by framing it. 😉

nanday conure embroidery

The next pictures show the birds in the wild. They used to be considered a type of parrot, but in 2005 additional research indicated they should be classified as a parakeet. They are also known as Nanday Parakeets or Black-hooded Parakeets. The Nanday Conure is native to South America but birds kept as pets and released are well established in parts of California, Texas, and Florida.

Picture of parakeets
Nanday Parakeets by Bernard DUPONT

According to this article in The Spruce Pets, nandays are affectionate and intelligent, speaking up to 20 words. However, they can be loud and have a strong beak so they shouldn’t be kept in an apartment or around small children. Nanday Conures are known for being mischievous and may try to escape. Escaped birds pose a threat to native birds and, because of this, they’re not allowed as pets in many parts of the United States.

Bird feeding on berries
Nanday Parakeet by Shanthanu Bhardwaj

Do you have artwork you would like to share? Be sure to include the First Friday Art tag.

First Friday Art