The Bend Wall: Monday Mural

You’ll find The The Bend Wall mural on the side of Newport Market, a neighborhood grocery store in Bend, Oregon. The bright painting covers a 100-foot long wall on the side of the building.

This impressive piece of artwork was created by Bend artist, Kim Smallenberg.

The mountain in the center of the mural is Pilot Butte, a dormant volcano. On the right side near the peak, you can see a small fire. On the Fourth of July, commercial fireworks are launched from Pilot Butte, and sometimes, it catches on fire. Our Fire Department is always there and ready.

The Bend Wall

A large metal sculpture of a bear sits in front of one end. The mural behind the bear shows dogs around a campfire. Bend is a dog-centered town. Many residents own one, or two, or…

Bear sculpture & dogs mural

The next section shows bridges over the Deschutes River. The solar eclipse is taking place in the skies. In 2017, we had prime viewing opportunities to watch the eclipse here in Central Oregon.

Mural at Newport Market

The next picture shows the heart of town. Kim included several local businesses in the painting. Look at the bottom right of the mural. Can you see beer mugs lining the road? We have a couple dozen breweries in Bend.

Love Bend painting

The last picture shows Mount Bachelor, an outdoor recreation destination. Tumalo Falls splashes down rocky cliffs in the foreground.

The Bend Wall mural

If you visit the west side of Bend, be sure to stop by and look at The Bend Wall. It’s huge and amazing!

Monday Mural

Cars from the Golden Age: LAPC

The Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum in Hood River, Oregon has a large collection of cars from the “Golden Age of Transportation” – the period from the early 1920s through the 1940s. The Museum has a collection of over 130 vehicles from the 1900s to the 1960s. You can get more information on vehicles in the collection by year or manufacturer here.

Cars from the Golden Age and beyond

Artifacts from the time period are on display near many of the cars. Here’s a camping scene.

Cars from the Golden Age

Storefronts around the perimeter of the building add visual interest to the collection.

Antique autos

The color and design of the cars make them great subjects for photographs.

Colorful old cars

Here’s a view of the car section from one of the entrances.

Old car collection

You will also see several vehicles displayed near the airplanes. This 1921 Ford Model T shows an example of a car converted into a pickup. Ford didn’t start making pickups until 1925.

Cars from the Golden Age

The 1925 Ford Model T 1-Ton Truck pictured below represents one of their first pickup trucks . This model sold for $295 in 1925.

Cars from the Golden Age

Right next to a yellow floatplane, you’ll see a 1941 Chevrolet Master Deluxe Business Coupe. Their lighted trunk and extra storage space appealed to traveling salesmen.

1941 Chevrolet

Learning something new…

I learned something new at this museum. Have you heard of micro cars or rat rods?

You’ll see cars you recognize plus some you probably never heard of, like this 1981 HMV Freeway micro car. The manufacturer guaranteed 100 MPG when traveling at 40 MPH in the High Mileage Vehicle (HMV).

1981 HMV Freeway

The two cars below are “rat rods.” Wikipedia says rat rods are custom cars “with a deliberately worn-down, unfinished appearance, typically lacking paint, showing rust, and made from cheap or cast-off parts. These parts can include non-automotive items that have been repurposed, such as a rifle used as a gear shifter, wrenches as door handles, or hand saws as sun visors.” 😯

Cars from the Golden Age

There’s a lot to see at this large museum. This post focuses on cars from the Golden Age and beyond. I’ll be featuring photographs of their airplane collection in the future.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Mechanical/Industrial

Whimsical doors in Tumalo, Oregon: Thursday Doors

I noticed these whimsical doors in Tumalo, Oregon while visiting a pod of food trucks. The Bite currently hosts five food trucks. You can get an assortment of beers on tap inside the main building. There is comfortable seating inside and out.

These paintings were done by local artist, Nicole Fontana. There are more pictures of her work at The Bite here. She even included her whimsical take on things in the signs for handicapped parking spots. 🙂

whimsical doors
Fishing fly painting

Thursday Doors

Fighting future fires for free

Here in Central Oregon, homeowners can take steps towards fighting future fires for free. In the spring, you can dispose of yard waste for no charge. In Bend this year, the free disposal runs from April 30 through May 15. Here’s a link showing dates at all locations. The landfill also takes yard waste for half price in early November.

fighting fires for free
Piles of yard waste

You may wonder why the local landfill is taking yard waste without charging the usual amount. Central Oregon is in the exceptional drought category, according to U.S. Drought Monitor.

Prineville Reservoir

We have received some welcome precipitation over the last few weeks, but local reservoirs are at historically low levels. Here are photos of Prineville Reservoir, 30 minutes east of my home in Bend. Can you see the horizontal lines along the shore showing previous water levels? The reservoir level is at 31% capacity. Crescent Lake, another local reservoir, is only 11% full.

Look how far the boat ramp is from the shore!

We have a range of habitats in this area. At my house, western junipers grow between sagebrush and bunchgrass. Our annual precipitation is 10 inches or less. On the west side of Bend, ponderosa pines tower over the landscape. The elevation increases and more precipitation falls as snow. Wildfires can affect both environments.

Fighting fire with fire

Wildfires have increased in size and severity. During the 2020 Oregon wildfire season, more than a million acres burned. We use prescribed burns to burn the undergrowth prior to the fire season.

Prescribed burn
Prescribed burn at High Desert Museum

How Central Oregon is fighting future fires for free

After a couple of devastating fires near Bend in the 1990s, a local fire marshal thought about what could be done to prevent future Central Oregon fires. An insurance company considered donating a new fire engine, but the marshal had a better idea. The FireFree group created guidelines to educate homeowners on how they could protect their property from wildfire. They recommended creating 30-100 feet of defensible space around houses. Recommendations included trimming or eliminating brush and trees near structures.

Fighting fire for free

FireFree came up with a plan to help homeowners fight future fires for free. They picked up yard waste at individual homes at no charge. The program switched to using landfill space a couple of years later. FireFree notes on their website, “The total amount of yard debris collected during FireFree events since 1999 is 444,605 cubic yards. This is enough yard debris to fill almost 44,500 dump trucks.”

Our contributions

We collected groundcover weeds and tumbleweeds (three kinds) from our 2.25-acre property this spring. The giant tumbleweed, with me standing behind it, was 7 feet 6 inches across.

This year, we trimmed low-growing western juniper branches to prevent fire from reaching the tree canopies. Juniper trees often split as they age, and we cut down a large splitter growing too close to our house.

Western juniper branches
6′ x 15′ pile of western juniper branches

We have taken nine loads to the landfill so far.

fighting fires for free
Trailer full of yard waste

I visited the landfill on the first FireFree day this year. Local news stations had been advertising this well-organized event.

Fighting fire for free
Sign for FireFree yard waste disposal

Trucks and cars lined up to dump their loads.

Yard waste
Vehicles dumping yard waste

The city often recycles yard waste into compost which you can purchase at the landfill.

FireFree is a great program other fire-prone communities should consider!

Yard waste at landfill
More vehicles dumping yard waste

Lower Crooked River drive – am & pm: LAPC & FFC

A couple days ago, we went on a Lower Crooked River drive. We were there early in the morning, attempting to avoid an incoming storm system. I remembered I had been there about a year earlier for an afternoon drive. How would the lighting differ in the photos taken on both trips?

Just south of Prineville, Oregon, the Lower Crooked River Back Country Byway winds its way along the Crooked River. The 43-mile long road meets up with Highway 20 to the south.

This post highlights the 8-mile section between Prineville Reservoir and Castle Rock. See map at the end of the post. On this drive, the curving lines of the road and river contrast with the straight lines of geological features.

A morning drive

As we drove north from the reservoir, shadows covered the east side of the road. The morning light cast a warm glow over the canyon lands.

Canyon views

Basalt columns looked pretty in full light…

Columnar basalt

But took on more character in the shadows.

columnar basalt

The Bureau of Land Management notes, “The most significant contributor to the outstandingly remarkable geologic resource are the unique intra-canyon basalt formations created by recurring volcanic and hydrologic activities.”

Chimney Rock was shrouded in shadows. Rays of sunlight snuck through the cloud cover to cast light near the butte’s base.

I have hiked the 1.3-mile trail to the base of Chimney Rock. You get 360-degree views of the landscape and, in the spring, you’ll see stunning desert wildflowers in bloom.

Chimney Rock

As we rounded another curve, I saw the dark gray palisade formations in the distance that always catch my attention.

Crooked River Canyon

An afternoon drive

I remembered seeing them a year before, driving from the opposite direction. The afternoon light was starting to shade the palisade formations near Palisades Campground.

Crooked River Canyon

Parts of the road were in full sunlight, while distant hillsides were shaded.

Winding road

The columns of basalt appeared to bend in the midday heat.

Near the northern end of the Lower Crooked River drive, where the scenic part begins, rimrock formations emerged from smooth hillsides. They serve as a gateway to the Lower Crooked River, where dramatic landforms reflect the light and absorb the shadows.

Crooked River Canyon

Lower Crooked River camping

This section of Highway 27 includes nine campsites and two day-use areas. See Lower Crooked Wild and Scenic River, Chimney Rock Segment for more information.

Bureau of Land Management

Lens- Artists Photo Challenge _ Light and Shadow

Friendly Friday – Leading Lines

Photo in thirds? Bending the rules: LAPC

When taking pictures, you might want to think about composing your photo in thirds. What?

According to the Digital Photography School, the rule of thirds “is a compositional guideline that breaks an image down into thirds (both horizontally and vertically) so you have nine pieces and four gridlines. According to the rule, by positioning key elements along the gridlines, you’ll end up with better compositions.”

While browsing my photos, I realized horizontal layers are more important to me in composition. Do my pictures always follow the rule of thirds guidelines? No, it’s okay to bend the rules.

SLR Lounge notes, “Of all the “rules” in photography, the rule of thirds is one of the easiest to successfully break.”

My photo in thirds examples (with layers)

This sandhill crane is in the upper third corner, but the differing textures and colors of the plants catch your attention. This photo has four layers.

Photo in thirds

This pronghorn is near the lower third of the picture. I could have cropped it more, but I didn’t want to cut out the misty mountains in the background. This photo has five layers.

Pronghorn at Yellowstone

Mount Bachelor, in the upper third of the photo, blends into a flat overcast sky. The foggy forest and flat lake are also muted in color. The “stars” of the picture are the multi-colored rushes and sedges in the foreground. This photo has five layers.

Mount Bachelor

The swans in this Summer Lake scene are near the center line. The dust storm is in the upper third. Both elements are interesting. This photo has a lot of layers – sky, mountains, dust storm, rushes, water, shoreline (with white alkaline deposits), and greasewood shrubs.

Summer Lake sandstorm

The last picture shows a fallen juniper tree in the foreground and the La Sal Mountains in the background. The twisting branches of the juniper are in the bottom third. This photo has four layers.

I don’t always pause to compose a photo in thirds, but I think the last photo comes closest to meeting the rule’s guidelines.

Photo in thirds in Utah

Remember, it’s okay to break the rules! Be spontaneous when taking photos and edit later.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Rule of thirds

The guy next door: Monochrome Monday

the guy next door buck

We have a resident herd of mule deer here and I refer to this buck as the guy next door. He didn’t seem to be bothered by my presence at all.

Monochrome Monday

A white poppy up close: Macro Monday

A white poppy up close growing in our garden last year. Poppies come in a variety of colors, but they’re also pretty in white.

a white poppy

Macro Monday

Had too much fun on Earth Day

too much fun dead juniper
Western juniper at Fischer Canyon, Oregon

This western juniper looks like it had too much fun on Earth Day. I think it was trying to sleep it off. 😉

Trees

Terry’s Hanger Shop: Monochrome Monday

Terrys Hanger Shop

Terry’s Hanger Shop is part of one of the displays at the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum located in Hood River, Oregon. This large museum features airplanes, automobiles, and other artifacts. This shop is one of the many storefronts featured around the perimeter of the building.

Did you notice the sign showing the hours they are open? “Gone Yesterday Today and Tomorrow.” Someone has a good sense of humor. 😉

Monochrome Monday

Gorgeous red Indian paintbrush: Friday Flowers

Gorgeous red Indian paintbrush

I saw this gorgeous red Indian paintbrush at Great Basin National Park in Nevada. This park doesn’t get as many visitors as others nearby, but it’s definitely worth a visit. We enjoyed our drive up to the the 10,000 foot level of Wheeler Peak. We drove by ancient stands of singleleaf pinyon pine, Great Basin bristlecone pine, and curlleaf mountain mahogany covered with a dusting of spring snow. These brilliant wildflowers were near the beginning of the 12-mile long Wheeler Peak Scenic Drive.

Friday Flowers

Stories unfolding in the rock in Wyoming: LAPC

When I drove the highway west of Cody, Wyoming, I saw stories unfolding in rock formations along the road.

The short paved trail in the photo below takes you to a place of wonderment along the North Fork Shoshone River.

Stories unfolding from a distance

The rock formations along the ridgetop are a village of homes with a view carved by the common folk. At one time, the richest man in town lived in a round home atop the tallest tower. He bragged about his wealth to anyone who would listen. One day, he danced with glee around and around inside the house. It fell to the ground, but he survived. From then on, he lived a humble life in a square home and he never danced again.

Stories unfolding in rock

Sheep Mountain is a distinctive landmark about 15 miles southwest of Cody.

Predators kept chasing bighorn sheep herds grazing in the Absaroka Mountains. One ram, larger than all the rest, laid down to keep watch atop a mountain. His immense size frightened the predators away, and he stands guard to this day.

Unfolding stories Sheep Mountain, Wyoming

Traveling farther west, you’ll notice a sign for another attraction. This is Chimney Rock, one of several places by that name in the United States.

Stories with a closer view

The best chef in the land baked a luscious layer cake of soft and hard rock for a special celebration. She told everyone not to touch it until the party.

Chimney Rock

Unfortunately, a hungry, mischievous child cut off a slice before the big event. Uh oh!

Chimney Rock

This appears to be a peaceful scene of multi-colored mountains bordered by trees growing near the river’s edge. Do you see the rock fence on the left side of the photo above the thick stand of green trees?

Stories unfolding Shoshone National Forest

If you look a little closer at the “fence” you’ll see where an angry giant tried to rip the earth apart, forming a deep rift. Stories unfolding in the rock are not always what they seem.

Rift in wyoming

The Palisades stand like elegant castles alongside one section of the road.

The Palisades, Wyoming

The royals wanted their people to have a comfortable place to live. Each shelf on the towers serves as a home for scaled, feathered, and furred residents. The grateful residents tend the gardens growing next to the towers, providing food for all.

The Palisades, Wyoming

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Earth story

Word of the Day – Wonderment

Lost Forest Pine tree: 1-to-3 Photo Challenge & TTL

Today I’m sharing a photograph of a Lost Forest pine tree processed three ways. The Lost Forest is a geographically isolated forest in the High Desert of Central Oregon. A visit to this unique forest inspired me to write a short story.

I’ll be showing how I processed this picture three ways with Corel PaintShop Pro 2021. Prior to trying out the various effects, I increased the contrast and vibrancy slightly.

The first two show the original and the same picture with a box camera effect. For this image I went to Effects>Photo Effects>Time Machine>Box camera. I was pleased how this effect enhanced details of the tree’s structure.

Lost Forest pine treeLost Forest pine tree box camera

The second two show the original Lost Forest pine tree and the same picture with a warming filter effect. For this image I went to Effects>Photo Effects>Film and Filters. I chose the Warm earth tones option with an orange warming filter. This effect made the tree’s red bark stand out. The puzzle-like bark of ponderosa pines is one of their most interesting features. This effect also highlighted the bare branches better than other effects I considered.

Lost Forest pine treeWarming filter on pine tree

The third two show the original and the same picture with a brush stroke effect. For this image I went to Effects>Art Media Effects>Brush strokes. I changed the Softness setting to 20. This artsy effect shows off the shapes and color of the tree and background sky.

Lost Forest pine treeBrush strokes pine tree

One-to-Three Photo Processing Challenge March 2022

Thursday Tree Love (TTL) 126

Stilbite up close: Macro Monday

This is a beautiful piece of stilbite up close. Specimens like these, from the stilbite subgroup, can be found near Mill Creek, Polk County, Oregon. The crystals on this mineral are gorgeous, but I also like the parallel lines surrounding the cavity in this piece.

Stilbite up close

Macro Monday

Gray fox basking in the sunlight: LAPC

A gray fox blissfully basking in the sunlight on a log.

Gray fox

Zooming in a little closer to see the details of her coat.

gray fox

Zooming in closer still to focus on her exquisite and intelligent face.

close up from High Desert Museum

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) #190 – Close and Closer

Delicate feather haiku: Weekly Haiku Challenge

delicate feather
propelled by whispers of wind
settles on snow drifts

Delicate feather

Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge – Feather & whisper

Sisters quilt mural: Monday Mural

Sisters quilt mural

This Sisters quilt mural is located in Barclay Park in Sisters, Oregon. This work by local artist, Jerry Werner, celebrates all that makes this town a vibrant community. In the past, Jerry worked as an illustrator for Walt Disney. His artwork includes murals, fine art, paintings, illustration and graphics, and sculptures.

The Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show bills itself as the world’s largest outdoor quilt show. More than 1,300 quilts are hung outside along the town’s main streets and visitors use maps to find them all. The quilts are amazing and show so much creativity and skill!

Monday Mural

The Meadow – A peaceful retreat: LAPC

For more than 25 years our family camped in a place we called “The Meadow” in northeastern Washington state. Though this site didn’t have luxuries like running water or restrooms, it was a peaceful retreat.

The first three pictures show different views of The Meadow. Stands of aspen and mixed conifers border the large grass meadow. This site is at an elevation of around 4,500 feet and hosts a wide variety of wildlife including three kinds of grouse, moose, deer, bear, cougar, and probably wolves. I had a memorable experience one day when a great gray owl drifted over me on its whisper quiet wings.

The next three photos show a couple of our pets from the past and a pest. Can you see the chipmunk silhouetted on the pine tree trunk? The chipmunks and camp robber birds would steal food right off your plate if you weren’t watching. In another picture you can see our dog, Keyah, walking in front of a place we called “Big Rock.” The kids loved climbing on top of this massive boulder. The other picture shows our dog, Leto, resting in front of the campfire. This boulder was a perfect backdrop for our fires.

The next three photos show a few of the treasures we found near our camp. The lichen looked as though someone sprayed it with fluorescent green paint. The dew-covered mushroom looked like a strange, rounded blob on the forest floor. But the best thing I ever found was a shed deer antler. After camping there for so many years and searching for antlers, I found this one right next to our campsite. The antler was found on our very last trip to The Meadow and it’s something I will always treasure.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) #188- A Special Place

Deschutes River sights to see: LAPC

Today I’m sharing Deschutes River sights to see. Since the river, located in central and northern Oregon, is 252 miles long, I’ll show just a few of its riches. At the end of this post, a map shows these locations.

Where the Deschutes begins

The first picture is of Little Lava Lake. This is a more peaceful place to kayak than the much larger Lava Lake. The spot below shows where the Deschutes River begins.

Little Lava Lake
Little Lava Lake

The next picture was taken on another kayaking trip near Harper Bridge in Sunriver. The waters are calm on this part of the river, but get much rougher when you get to Benham Falls, a class V section. I got out well ahead of the falls!

Kayaking on the Deschutes River 10Sept2016
North of Harper Bridge

A river of falls

FYI – Deschutes means “of the falls” in French. You can find four waterfalls in close proximity north of Benham Falls. These include Dillon Falls, Upper Deschutes River Falls, and Lava Island Falls.

Here are two pictures of Dillon Falls – one at the top and one of the falls.

In Bend, they created artificial water features at the Bend Whitewater Park. I’ve seen engineers standing near the park changing how the river flows with a handheld tablet. This section of the Deschutes River is divided into three sections. One is for inner tubing enthusiasts, another is for surfers, and the other section is for wildlife. The wildlife section is not accessible to swimmers or surfers.

Deschutes River sights north of Bend

The next picture shows The Cove Palisades State Park from above. The river on the left is the Deschutes River and the one on the right is the Crooked River. This park is very popular with people looking for water-related activities in the summer.

Deschutes River sights
The Cove Palisades State Park

This next Deschutes River sight is along the Trout Creek trail. This easy, level trail is not used as heavily as others in the area. Rock climbers love to climb on the rock formations in this canyon.

Deschutes River sights Trout Creek
Near Trout Creek Campground

Where the Deschutes ends

The next picture is a view looking west from the Washington side of the Columbia River. You can see Mount Hood in the distance. The end of the Deschutes River is located on the Oregon side almost right below the mountain in this view.

I took these pictures from the Stonehenge WWI Memorial, located in Maryhill, Washington. Did you know there’s a replica of England’s Stonehenge in Washington state? It was commissioned by Sam Hill and opened in 1918.

I’m including a map of the entire river basin with Deschutes River sights I mentioned marked. Interestingly, this map did not include Little Lava Lake so my mark is in the approximate location. There is much to see and do along the course of this beautiful river.

Deschutes River sights
Map of Deschutes River Basin from Wikipedia

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Water

Hells Canyon Overlook views: Pull up a Seat Challenge

These Hells Canyon Overlook views were taken in the Hells Canyon Recreation area in northeastern Oregon. Though more people are familiar with the Grand Canyon, Hells Canyon is the deepest river gorge in North America. He Devil Peak, on the East Rim, stands 8,043 feet above the Snake River, at the bottom of the gorge.

Hells Canyon overlook view

You can learn about this unique geological feature at the Hell’s Canyon Creek Visitor Center in Imnaha. When we visited in June a couple of years ago, the road to the center was still closed due to snow so check ahead of time.

Scenic views in Oregon

Visitors seeking Hells Canyon views in the spring and early summer are rewarded by a wide variety of wildflowers in bloom at the scenic overlook. See Hells Canyon in the Spring for closer views of these beauties.

Wildflowers in NE Oregon

Pull Up a Seat Challenge

Plains Indian Museum, Wyoming: LAPC

Today I’m sharing pictures taken at the Plains Indian Museum section of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. This world-class museum has five sections focused on western history, culture, and the environment. It’s in Cody, Wyoming, a half an hour drive from the east entrance to Yellowstone National Park.

The theme this week for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is “low light.” Museums and galleries often have challenging lighting for taking photographs. I used my Samsung phone to take most of these photos since it does well in low light conditions. I’ll share some of my tips for taking and editing photos.

The first image shows a war lodge. Warriors made these temporary structures in wooded areas to hide their presence in enemy territory.

There was a reflection of a large blue screen on the right side of the image that I eliminated with my editing program, Corel PaintShop Pro 2021. I also used a vignette effect to direct viewers to the most interesting parts of this structure.

Stick tee pee in Cody museum

The next picture shows part of a display of several headdresses. Members of the Blackfeet tribe created the bonnet on the left ca. 1850. It includes golden eagle and great horned owl feathers, buffalo horns, tanned hide, horse hair, ermine, porcupine quills, wood, wool, silk ribbon, and cotton thread.

I erased a dark part of the base and dimmed the lights. In this case, I cloned darker colors near the lights onto the bright bulbs.

Headresses

Plains Indian on the move and at home

The next photo shows a family traveling with a dog who is pulling their supplies with a travois. A large dog could pull 75 pounds and this was a common practice among Plains Indians.

This image had several reflections from the overhead spotlights on the background photo. I used cloning and the scratch remover tool to get rid of them.

Plains Indian on the move

The next photo shows a woman on horseback with an infant on her back. Cradleboards of Plains Indians were bordered with leather, forming a sort of hood. These cradleboards combined elements of woodwork, basketry, and beadwork.

I cropped this down a lot, but left some dark cording at the bottom so I could show the horse’s front hooves. You sometimes have to work around things meant to protect the displays. Once again, I removed reflections from ceiling lights.

Plains Indian woman

The next image shows a tipi made of heavy canvas. Most were covered with bison hides before the 1880s, but they did not last as long as canvas. These were more permanent than stick war lodges and could be moved easily.

I debated cropping more off the top because of the bright spotlight. I left it in to show more of the structure. In this case, I dimmed all the spotlights by using the burn tool. This darkened the brightness slightly.

Tee pee

This picture is of an earth lodge. Tribes living in the Upper Missouri region used these more permanent structures. They covered timber framed structures with sod and these houses protected people from temperature extremes.

I cropped out as much as I could around the building while keeping the blue-edged ceiling structure. I thought it looked like a flattened flying saucer. 😉

Plains Indian building

The artistry of Plains Indians

This picture shows several decorated shields created by men of the tribe. The shields portray images of elements of nature thought to bring them protection in battle.

I eliminated spotlight reflections but left the long, horizontal reflection. Sometimes you can’t eliminate all the distractions.

Museum display in Cody

This display shows how Plains Indian tribes adapted to new resources. When European settlers and hunters moved into their lands in the 1870s, they brought colorful beads to use in trade.

For this image, I shifted position until I found a spot without reflections. I used the perspective corrector on the largest sign to make it easier to read.

Display at Cody museum

This display shows more examples of beadwork. Each tribe used distinctive patterns to decorate items such as bonnets, purses, and cradleboards.

This display had a couple of distracting marks on the background display board, and I erased them.

Plains Indian beadwork

This colorful piece is a traveling medicine doll. It includes tripod sticks, symbolizing tipi poles. The items being carried represent things of importance to a Crow family while moving. It was not a toy.

Displays are often full of multiple pieces, so if some interest you, be sure to zoom in close. I cropped out adjacent pieces and bumped up the vibrancy of the already vibrant colors.

Traveling medicine doll

This is a representation of a more modern Native American family home. Note the artistry of the quilt and beadwork displayed around the room.

Sometimes you need to be patient while others view displays. I waited a couple minutes to take this picture. At popular attractions, like the arches in Utah, I’ve politely asked visitors to step back for a second so I can take a quick picture.

Display at museum in Cody

Living off the land

This picture shows examples of plants important to native people of the plains. They used these plants for many purposes, including food, medicine, natural dyes, and raw materials for clothing and tools. I have an interest in these plants because I may include them in a book I’m working on.

I used a perspective corrector to bring the framed pieces back to their true rectangular form. Though I attempted to lighten the specimens, the lighting was uneven in this display case.

Pressed plants

The next photo is of the sign below the pressed plant display. I don’t normally share pictures I take of signs on my blog or newsletters.

If you plan to write about something you saw later, take pictures of the signs. I wish I would have figured that out long ago!

Sign in museum in Cody

One more bit of advice… be careful when taking pictures of display cases and framed artwork covered by glass. It’s easy to get a picture of yourself in the reflections. 😀

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) – Low light

Winter aspen silhouette at sunrise: TTL & SF

A winter aspen silhouette with a dramatic sunrise in the background photographed in Bend, Oregon. Spring is making an early appearance here in the High Desert and trees may be starting to leaf out soon.

Yesterday it was 73 degrees F here! Our high temperatures are usually in the mid-30s to 40s at this time of the year. We are having a weird, mild winter.

winter aspen silhouette

Thursday Tree Love #123

Skywatch Friday

A rabble of robins: SS & WWP

A rabble of robins settles in my backyard. Five species of thrushes often pause for a quick drink, but I’m flummoxed by the American Robins this year. There are hundreds! Plentiful food, a mild winter, or enchantment in the water? Who knows…

a rabble of robins
A rabble of robins
More robins
More rabbles of robins
Cooper's hawk
The bird I’m feeding – a Cooper’s hawk
Remnants of a songbird
Remnants of a robin

Sunday Stills (SS)- Are you a bird feeder?

Weekend Writing Prompt (WWP) #247- Flummox (42 words)

Big changes at the Amphitheater: LAPC

There have been some big changes at the amphitheater in Bend, Oregon. I featured the art in and around this venue in a post in June 2020. At that time, it was called the Les Schwab Amphitheater. It was named after a local entrepreneur who developed a thriving national tire business. Now the site is the Hayden Homes Amphitheater, named after a local home builder.

This site, the largest outdoor music venue in Bend, hosts concerts as well as events like Brewfest. Live Nation, the world’s leading live entertainment company, will partner with Hayden Homes in managing events. This page lists events scheduled for 2022.

Before and after views of the big changes

Today I’ll turn my lenses toward some of the changes at this site.

The stage before was small with whimsical art on the front and back. Here’s the artwork that was on the back of the stage. I loved the raven in this mural.

Art at the Amphitheater , Bend, Oregon November 2018

The new industrial-style stage is much larger and has a big open “window” space to take in the view.

Close view of stage

The next two pictures show the before and after images of the stage. Prior to the changes, shows set up a limited number of folding chairs and a set of bleachers.

Art at the Amphitheater , Bend, Oregon November 2018big changes at the amphitheater

Now, attendees that buy seats can sit in a couple semi-permanent structures. Many concert goers choose the less expensive option of standing.

Outdoor concert seating

I took this picture of the rules of the venue last summer. Last week they decided you cannot bring your own chair to any event. However, they’ll gladly rent you a chair!

Rules of the venue

During the concert season, food and drink carts are set up near the entrance.

Food carts in Bend, Oregon

They are currently in the process of shifting the trail’s location and building a new main entrance. This photo shows the construction in progress today.

Construction in Old Mill

The next two photos show a before and after view of the stage from across the river.

View of amphitheater in Bend, Oregon November 2018Big changes at the amphitheater

Do you see the dark shape on the rocks in the middle of the Deschutes River in the second picture? That’s an eagle that followed me on my morning walk. It wasn’t sure if it liked the big changes at the amphitheater and took flight in search of quieter environments.

Eagle in Bend, Oregon

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) #185 – Change

On distant trails: LAPC, WWP, & SS

I saunter along distant trails, not knowing what wonders nature will share with me.


Will falling water sing between rocky cliffs?

Multnomah Falls
Multnomah Falls, Oregon


Will earth show its origins in the soil?

Distant trails Painted Hills
Painted Hills, Oregon


Will wind turn wheels of history over parched plains?

Fort Rock
Fort Rock, Oregon


And when I return home from distant trails, will fireworks light the skies?

Sunrise over Bend
Bend, Oregon

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) – Travel has taught me

Weekend Writing Prompt – Saunter (51 words)

Sunday Stills – The power of the elements: Earth, air/wind, fire, & water

Along the Mud Volcano Trail: Monochrome Monday

These are some of the sights you’ll see along the Mud Volcano Trail in Yellowstone National Park.

Here is Mud Volcano, located at the base of the trail. It used to have a 30-foot tall volcanic cone. Albert C. Peale, a member of the 1871 Hayden Geological Survey, noted, “The trees all about this place are coated with mud showing that it throws out mud sometimes to a considerable height.”

However, sometime prior to the area being designated a National Park in 1872, the cone blew up in an eruption. This area is still worth a visit. The rumbling sounds, smell of sulfur, and various thermal features make it a treat for the senses.

Mud volcano

Here’s a closer look at the cracked mud around the base of Mud Volcano.

close up of cracked mud

The 0.7-mile trail includes these stairs that take you up to Black Dragon’s Cauldron and the Sizzling Basin. They certainly came up with some interesting names for these thermal features!

Stairs on Mud Volcano Trail

Monochrome Monday

A fruit-filled Friday: FOTD Challenge

I’m sharing memories of a fruit-filled Friday in Hood River, Oregon last fall. We took a trip to northern Oregon in search of fall foliage, but stopped to buy some tasty fruit in Hood River. These apples were at Smiley’s Red Barn, one of 26 stops along the Hood River Fruit Loop. Visitors can stop at fruit stands, orchards, wineries, and vineyards along this route. If you’re craving a good beer, check out some of the great breweries and pubs within a half hour from Hood River.

Flower of the Day (FOTD) Challenge

Special somethings around the house: LAPC

This post includes photos of smaller-sized special somethings collected over the years.

Special somethings discovered

The first photo shows a radiator cap from a 1928 Pontiac. We found it buried in the forest where we used to live. The Indian brave sculpture is so detailed!

Special somethings radiator cap

The next photo shows a picture of my favorite salt & pepper shakers. This pair was found in an antique store in Snohomish, Washington. I’m not sure what year these were made, but they look like Depression-era glassware.

Depression glass S & P

Things from the earth

The next photo shows a piece of black obsidian. I found this piece at Glass Buttes, about an hour east of Bend, Oregon. This rock has radiating curves that developed as it cooled thousands of years ago.

Special somethings black obsidian

The next photo shows a fossil gingko leaf. This was found at Stonerose Interpretive Center & Eocene Fossil Site in Republic, Washington. We took our family there to dig for fossils as part of our annual camping trip. It’s my favorite fossil I’ve ever found because I love gingko trees!

Fossil gingko leaf

Special things with sentimental value

The next photo is of a mug and planter. These were purchased decades ago in Rhodes, Greece by my dad when he was in the Navy. I assumed they must be valuable, but recently found a set of three of these mugs for $45 on eBay. Oh well, I still like them.

Ikaros pottery from Greece

The last photo is of a toy stereo. When I was a teenager, I asked for a stereo every year for Christmas. Our family was not well off financially and stereos used to cost a lot more then, relatively speaking. They bought me this one year and, even though it’s not in great shape anymore, I’ve kept it around to remind myself you don’t always get what you want. 😁

Toy stereo

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) #182 – Interesting Objects

Blanket flowers up close: Macro Monday

Here’s a photo of blanket flowers up close that I took last summer. These perennial flowers are big and showy. Their contrasting colors make them stand out as a star in any garden. These easy to grow plants are also drought tolerant. They attract butterflies and birds.

Blanket flowers up close

Macro Monday

Diaphanous strands haiku: OLWG, LAPC, WS

diaphanous strands
a colorful serape
muffles winter’s chill

Diaphanous strands of clouds

Online Writers Guild (OLWG) – #242 – A colorful serape

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge (LAPC) #181 – Double Dipping

Weekend Sky (WS) #51

Pronghorn near Prineville: 1-to-3 Photo Challenge

I saw this herd of pronghorn near Prineville, Oregon last spring. I’ll be showing how I processed this photo three ways with Corel PaintShop Pro 2021.

Prior to trying various effects, I increased the brightness, contrast, fill light, and clarity. Since this photo was taken from a distance, I also adjusted the sharpness.

The first two show the original image and the same picture with a Film and Filters effect. For this image I went to Effects>Film and Filters. I selected Vibrant Foliage from the first pulldown menu and Warming Filter from the second one. The orange filter brought out the pronghorn’s tawny coats. The vibrant foliage filter enhanced blues and greens in this scene.

Pronghorn near PrinevilleWarming filter

The next two show the original image and the same picture with a Hot Wax Coating effect. For this image I went to Effects>Artistic Effects>Hot Wax Coating.  This effect gives an almost comic book-like effect with enhanced edges. The images appear to be coated in a thin layer of wax.

Pronghorn near PrinevillePronghorn near Prineville

The last two show the original image and the same picture with an Aged Newspaper effect. For this image I went to Effects>Artistic Effects>Aged Newspaper. You can choose how old you want the picture to look. I chose 50 years. More recent options appear more black and white, while older ones have a more yellowed appearance. This effect slightly blurs the edges to make them resemble images in old newspapers.

Pronghorn near PrinevilleAged newspaper effect

One-to-Three Photo Processing Challenge – December 2021

Mix Tape A & B Mural: Monday Murals

This Mix Tape A & B mural, by artist Erik Hoogen, is located at Silver Moon Brewing in Bend, Oregon. Erik worked on this labor of love seasonally for two years. This large work of art is located in a narrow alley so instead of trying to show it in one photo, I took several.

I am so impressed by this mural! It’s difficult to paint with a monotone palette and Erik made it look easy.

Mix tape A & B

He captured the essence of these musicians from different times and genres.

Musician mural

Many of the musicians are portrayed in iconic poses.

Mix Tape A & B

However, Erik also showed his sense of humor. Can you find a glam rock musician with his fingers in his ears in one of these photos? Did you spot the rapper drinking a Silver Moon beer?

Musician mural

He also incorporated powerful words to go along with the images. On one side it says,

A painting is music U can see. Music is a painting U can hear.

Miles Davis

On the other side, it says, “One Love, Unity, & Respect” and “Cheers.”

Mix Tape A & B

There are small touches of color in this mural. Did you notice the orange butterflies fluttering among the musicians?

Musician mural

And what about that door? In reality, it’s just an ordinary exterior door. I love how he made it into something amazing!

Musician mural

For a peek at a mural inside Silver Moon, see Pub Art at Silver Moon Brewing.

Some of the codes restricting where murals could be located in Bend were eliminated in 2019. Mix Tape A & B is one of the many murals that have appeared in the past couple of years as a result of that change. Lucky us!

Monday Mural

Reindeer tryouts at Malheur NWR: Wordless Wednesday

Santas reindeer tryouts
Reindeer tryouts at Malheur NWR, Oregon

Wordless Wednesday https://wordpress.com/tag/wordless-wednesday

A tumbleweed snowman: Sunday Stills

I decided to make a tumbleweed snowman from the giant tumbleweed I recently found in my yard. In my previous post, Giant tumbleweed in my yard, I tried to show the scale of this tumbleweed. It measured 7 feet 6 inches across!

Since it’s December, I thought I might as well have some fun with it. We tied it to a tree to keep it from blowing away. I added a smaller tumbleweed to make a head.

 A tumbleweed snowman

It’s kinda hard to see his face so I zoomed in. The branches are spaced far apart on the top tumbleweed so his face is held on with a few twist ties. Can you see his lichen eyelashes and juniper nose and smile?

A crazy snowman

A string of battery-powered lights added some holiday cheer.

Lighted tumbleweed snowman

Hope you enjoyed my High Desert tumbleweed snowman. Happy Holidays! 😀

Sunday Stills – Light the Night

Giant tumbleweed in my yard: KOB

I found a giant tumbleweed in my yard after a big wind storm earlier this month. I took a photo of it, but it didn’t really show the scale.

Giant tumbleweed

Can you tell how big it is when I put my medium-sized dog, Shelby, and my large-sized dog, Tesla, in the picture? They were glad it didn’t tumble on top of them. 😀

Dogs and invasive weed

How about if I stand behind it? I’m 5 foot 4 inches tall. Can you see me?

Giant tumbleweed

Finally, I decided to show the tumbleweed in front of my little blue Subaru. I wouldn’t want this thing rolling in front of me when driving down the road!

Invasive weed in front of car

Can you guess how big this giant tumbleweed was? 7 feet 6 inches across. A whopper!

Kammie’s Oddball Photo Challenge (KOB)

Beaded buckskin Powwow outfit: Wordless Wednesday

Beaded buckskin Powwow outfit
Beaded buckskin Powwow outfit, High Desert Museum, OR

Wordless Wednesday